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Food Access

 This research explores how businesses on the high street can impact the health of the public and includes league tables ranking the "unhealthiest" high streets across London and the UK.The report also includes a range of measures to make high streets more health promoting, including: 

  • Local authorities to be given greater planning powers to prevent the proliferation of betting shops, payday lenders and fast food outlets
  • Public health criteria to be a condition of licensing for all types of business
  • Mandatory food hygiene ratings linked to calorie and nutrition labelling for fast food outlets
  • A limit of 5% of each type of business on a high street in order to avoid oversaturation and provide affordable choice
  • Legislation to enable local councils to set their own differential business rates to encourage healthier outlets and discourage those that are detrimental to health.

You can access this resource by clicking here

This resource describes how public health in a number of councils has started to use the opportunities of a local government setting to improve health and wellbeing.

The case studies were chosen because they show a range of ways in which public health in councils is approaching working with local business. They include councils spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. The LGA looks forward to seeing many more such examples of local energy and innovation in the months and years to come, and seeing the measurable impact it will have. The challenge for us all is not just to identify good practice, but to champion and share it.

Case studies include:

  • Creating a healthier workplace
  • Creating a less obeseogenic enviornment
  • Improving child vaccination rates
  • Working with early year providers

You can download the resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1zSrjOh

This resource describes how public health in a number of councils has started to use the opportunities of a local government setting to improve health and wellbeing.

The case studies were chosen because they show a range of ways in which public health in councils is approaching working with local business. They include councils spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. The LGA looks forward to seeing many more such examples of local energy and innovation in the months and years to come, and seeing the measurable impact it will have. The challenge for us all is not just to identify good practice, but to champion and share it.

Case studies include:

  • Creating a healthier workplace
  • Creating a less obeseogenic enviornment
  • Improving child vaccination rates
  • Working with early year providers

You can download the resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1zSrjOh

This report, produced by Sharon Tonge (Health Improvement Practitioner (Communities) – Public Health, Bolton Council), examines food purchasing habits. This research focuses on where food is purchased (and why food is purchased there), what food is purchased and the rationale behind purchase choices as well as the major influences on people’s food choices. Primary research was undertaken in Farnworth, Bolton and sits alongside a literature review summarising the factors that underpin and influence food consumption.

A Health Impact Assessment examining the evidence base for tackling food poverty in Bolton undertaken by the Public Health Team. The Health Impact Assessment identified various health interventions linked to food poverty through barriers discussed within the report and ascribed positive and negative health impacts to these interventions including evidence -based recommendations. This report should be of great interest to people involved in the commissioning of, or provision of services related to any aspects of health inequalities or general poverty work.

 

The term ‘obesogenic environment’ refers to the role environmental factors may play in determining both nutrition and physical activity. Environmental factors may operate by determining the availability and consumption of different foodstuffs and the levels of physical activity undertaken by populations. This review considers the research evidence regarding the existence of obesogenic environments, placing particular emphasis on evidence from the United Kingdom.

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