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Accidents

This is the JSNA chapter on childhood accidents. Theme chapters summarise who is at risk and why, the level of need in the population, service provision and use, unmet needs, the evidence base, highlight the key issues and gaps, and provides recommendations for commissioners.

A collection of resources that enable Local Authorities and partners to develop injury prevention strategies for children and young people. You can access these resources by clicking here: bit.ly/1qxUYHE.

This evidence briefing examines the economic costs of physical inactivity (sedentary behaviour) in relation to:

  • Cardiovascular Disease - CHD & Stroke
  • Cancer - Bowel & Breast Cancer
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Falls

Whilst this report is brief, it provides a snapshot of costs and is a good starting point for any commissioning activity related to above topics

The Public Health Outcomes Framework Healthy lives, healthy people: Improving outcomes and supporting transparency sets out a vision for public health, desired outcomes and the indicators that will help us understand how well public health is being improved and protected. The framework concentrates on two high-level outcomes to be achieved across the public health system, and groups further indicators into four ‘domains’ that cover the full spectrum of public health. The outcomes reflect a focus not only on how long people live, but on how well they live at all stages of life. This profile currently presents data for the first set of indicators at England and upper tier local authority levels, collated by the public health observatories in England. The profile allows you to:

  • Compare your local authority against other authorities in the region
  • Benchmark your local authority against the England average

Public Health Outcomes Framework baseline data will be revised and corrected in accordance with the general DH statistical policy on revisions and corrections. This profile should be a must read for all those involved in the commissioning and management of services associated with public health and health inequalities.

This is the Childhood Accidents JSNA Indicator Sheet from the Child and Maternal Health section (updated May 2015). JSNA Indicator Sheets summarise the current position and recent trends for Bolton, comparators to Bolton, and inequalities across population groups and geographical areas of Bolton.

Headlines

  • Child mortalities from accidents are very rare with just 15 cases in Bolton between 2002 and 2010;
  • Hospital admissions for serious accidental injury in Bolton are erratic for children aged 0-4 years, but are steadily reducing in line with England for children aged 5-14 years;
  • At national level (necessary due to small numbers at district level), at least a third of accidental deaths are due to "other transport accidents"; the exception being children aged 0-4 years where suffocation is the most common cause;
  • There are inequalities across NS-SEC groups with the less affluent classifications having far higher rates of accidental child mortality.

Profile report detailing the types of injury attendances to Royal Bolton Hospital between April 2011 and March 2012.

This is the Mortality and Admissions due to Accidents (Child Health) JSNA Indicator Sheet from the Child and Maternal Health section. JSNA Indicator Sheets summarise the current position and recent trends for Bolton, comparators to Bolton, and inequalities across population groups and geographical areas of Bolton.

Headlines

  • Child mortalities from accidents are very rare with just 15 cases in Bolton between 2002 and 2010;
  • Hospital admissions for serious accidental injury in Bolton are erratic for children aged 0-4 years, but are steadily reducing in line with England for children aged 5-14 years;
  • At national level (necessary due to small numbers at district level), at least a third of accidental deaths are due to "other transport accidents"; the exception being children aged 0-4 years where suffocation is the most common cause;
  • There are inequalities across NS-SEC groups with the less affluent classifications having far higher rates of accidental child mortality.

The online Injury Profiles provide a snapshot of injuries occurring in each local authority in England. Interactive maps and charts enable comparisons to be made regionally and nationally for over 40 injury related indicators.

http://www.apho.org.uk/default.aspx?QN=INJURY_DEFAULT

An analysis of the number of children killed or seriously injured in road traffic collisions in Bolton in 2010.

This is one of three pieces of NICE guidance published in November 2010 on how to prevent unintentional injuries among under-15s. A second publication covers unintentional injuries in the home and a third covers strategies, regulation, enforcement, surveillance and workforce development.

This guidance is for local highway authorities, local strategic partnerships, directors of public health, health professionals who have a responsibility for preventing or treating unintentional injuries affecting children and young people aged under 15, and school travel planners.

It may also be of interest to road users, children, young people, their parents and carers and other members of the public.

The guidance covers 20 mph limits, 20mph zones and engineering measures to reduce speed or make routes safer.

The recommendations include advice on:

  • How health professionals and local highways authorities can coordinate work to make the road environment safer.
  • Introducing engineering measures to reduce vehicle speeds, in line with Department for Transport guidance.
  • Making routes commonly used by children and young people safer. This includes routes to schools and parks.

Follow the link for full details:http://guidance.nice.org.uk/PH31

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