Digestive Disease | Boltons Health Matters
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Digestive Disease

The liver disease profiles provide an invaluable resource relating to one of the main causes of premature mortality nationally; a disease whose mortality rates are increasing in England, while decreasing in most EU countries. The local authority profiles will support the development of Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and work of Health and Wellbeing Boards presenting local key statistics and highlighting questions to ask locally about current action to prevent liver disease. The website contains data for Upper Tier Local Authorities, former Government Office regions, England and where available Lower Tier Local Authorities. The downloadable PDF profiles are produced for each Upper Tier Local Authority and contain key facts, prevention strategies, questions that you should ask locally and links to further resources. This resource can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/ZY2i6y and from here all data (including Bolton level) can obtained.

This report presents data on liver disease in the North West of England, describing the burden by age, sex, deprivation and geography. It explores routinely available data for the main causes of liver disease; alcohol, hepatitis B and C and fatty liver disease. It will be a useful resource for Directors of Public Health, health and wellbeing boards, commissioners and providers of services and others involved in liver disease. The data is commonly shown at a local authority level, when it is available.

This is the Chronic liver disease JSNA Indicator Sheet from the Mortality section. JSNA Indicator Sheets summarise the current position and recent trends for Bolton, comparators to Bolton, and inequalities across population groups and geographical areas of Bolton.

Headlines

 

  • For both sexes mortality from chronic liver disease is currently much higher in Bolton than it is regionally and nationally;
  • Mortality from chronic liver disease is increasing in Bolton - this is in line with the regional and national pattern;
  • There is a marked gradient across quintiles and a significant widening of the inequality gap between the most deprived quintile and Bolton in recent times;
  • Mortality is greatest in the South East of the borough, where rates can be over three and a half times the average for England;
  • Bolton has a higher mortality rate than is average for its peer group.

 

This is the Hospital Admissions for Gastroenteritis JSNA Indicator Sheet from the Child and Maternal Health section (updated May 2015). JSNA Indicator Sheets summarise the current position and recent trends for Bolton, comparators to Bolton, and inequalities across population groups and geographical areas of Bolton.

Headlines

  • Bolton has a higher rate of admissions in children for gastroenteritis than England, and historically (since 2004/05) has generally been higher than the North West for both boys and girls;
  • There is no significant difference between admissions across the first four deprivation quintiles (the least deprived group are significantly lower however);
  • Great Lever and The Orchards stand out as the Childrens Centre Reach Areas with the highest rates of admissions in Bolton;
  • Bolton is amongst the districts with the highest rate of admissions for gastroeneritis within the Greater Manchester connurbation.

The Medicine for Managers briefings are succinct profiles of particular diseases or conditions compiled by Dr Paul Lambden for nhsmanagers.net. They provide a useful overview of the disease, with an explanation of the causes and possible treatments, as well as epidemiological information. This briefing centres on Hepatitis B.

 The Medicine for Managers briefings are succinct profiles of particular diseases or conditions compiled by Dr Paul Lambden for nhsmanagers.net. They provide a useful overview of the disease, with an explanation of the causes and possible treatments, as well as epidemiological information. This briefing centres on Hepatitis A.

This report presents key facts about deaths from liver disease in England. It highlights differences in place and cause of death by age, sex and deprivation. It is aimed at
commissioners and providers of end of life care, clinicians caring for patients with liver disease, and others concerned with providing quality end of life care for this patient group, including patients themselves and their carers.

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