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Mental Health

‘Future in mind – promoting, protecting and improving our children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing’ makes a number of proposals the government wishes to see by 2020. These include:

  • tackling stigma and improving attitudes to mental illness
  • introducing more access and waiting time standards for services
  • establishing ‘one stop shop’ support services in the community
  • improving access for children and young people who are particularly vulnerable

The report sets out how much of this can be achieved through better working between the NHS, local authorities, voluntary and community services, schools and other local services. It also makes it clear that many of these changes can be achieved by working differently, rather than needing significant investment.

You can access this resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1wUwiQx


These toolkits are a collaboration between the Royal College of Nursing and Public Health England

They are primarily for nurses who work with children and young people, whether in community or hospital settings, including:

  • school nurses
  • practice nurses
  • accident and emergency nurses

These toolkits aim to:

  • develop skills and knowledge and recognise the wider context of mental health in relation to LGBT sexual orientation and identity.
  • provide a general outline for health professionals looking to increase their skills and knowledge around suicide prevention strategies with LGBT young people

This resource can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1EpBHPr

The framework aims to widen the responsibility for improving public mental health beyond those professions on the public health register, or with a specific role in public health. Teachers, early years workers, nurses, GPs, housing officers, psychiatrists and employers are all identified as having an important role.

The aim of the framework is to build the capacity and capability of leaders, and developing a workforce that is confident, competent, and committed to:

  • promoting good mental health across the population
  • preventing mental illness and suicide
  • improving the quality and length of life of people living with mental illness

This resource can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1989S44

This report summarises the latest trends, research and developments on suicide prevention in England. This report:

  • calls on services to be more ambitious about suicide prevention, and challenge the assumption that suicide is inevitable
  • highlights 3 areas in England that have already adopted a zero suicide ambition
  • outlines how services can improve by adopting this new attitude and effective interventions

The annual report has been prepared with the input of leading experts in the field of suicide prevention, including the members of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group.

To access the resource, please click here: http://bit.ly/1w0wBt

This briefing was commissioned by PHE and written by the Institute of Health Equity. It is a summary of a more detailed evidence review on the same topic and is intended primarily for directors of public health, public health teams and local authorities. This briefing and accompanying evidence reviews are part of a series commissioned by PHE to describe and demonstrate effective, practical local action on a range of social determinants of health.

You can view the briefing by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1CcHHYP

The associated evidence summary is: Local action on health inequalities: Building children and young people’s resilience in schools

Summary
1. Resilience is the capacity to bounce back from adversity. Protective factors increase resilience, whereas risk factors increase vulnerability. Resilient individuals, families and communities are more able to deal with difficulties and adversities than those with less resilience.
2. Those who are resilient do well despite adversity, although it does not imply that those who are resilient are unharmed – they often have poorer outcomes than those who have low-risk background but less resilience. This applies to health outcomes and affects success in a range of areas of life across the life course. Evidence shows that resilience could contribute to healthy behaviours, higher qualifications and skills, better employment, better mental well-being, and a quicker or more successful recovery from illness.
3. Resilience is not an innate feature of some people’s personalities. Resilience and adversity are distributed unequally across the population, and are related to broader socioeconomic inequalities which have common causes – the inequities in power, money and resources that shape the conditions in which people live and their opportunities, experiences and relationships.
4. Those who face the most adversity are least likely to have the resources necessary to build resilience. This ‘double burden’ means that inequalities in resilience are likely to contribute to health inequalities.
5. Schools have a key opportunity to build resilience among children and young people, and there is a range of ways in which local authorities can support and encourage schools to take action.
6. Actions to increase resilience can be targeted at different levels - they can aim to increase achievements of pupils; to support them through transitions and encourage healthy behaviours; to promote better interpersonal relationships between people – particularly parents or carers and children; and to create more supportive, cohesive schools that support both pupils and the wider community.

This review provides a summary of evidence about the effect of resilience on health, the unequal distribution of resilience and its contribution to levels of health inequalities. The review outlines the potential actions that can be taken in schools in order to build resilience for all children and young people and reduce inequalities in resilience.

This evidence review was commissioned by Public Health England and researched, analysed and written by the UCL Institute of Health Equity. These papers show evidence for interventions on social issues that lead to poor health, including ways to deal with health inequalities. You can use them to get practical tips for dealing with these issues. They also show examples from local areas showing interventions that have been used to improve health. The series includes eight evidence reviews and 14 short briefing papers.

The documents can be used by:

  • local authority professionals whose work has implications for health and wellbeing, such as children’s services and planning services
  • local authorities - particularly directors of public health and their teams - to build health and wellbeing strategies and Joint Strategic Needs Assessments
  • public health teams making a case for action on health inequalities
  • health and wellbeing boards making local public health strategies, including those covering service areas with health implications such as Local Plans and Growth Plans

This evidence summary can be accessed by clicking here:

The full list of resources can be viewed on this page: http://bit.ly/YiMHgX

The Children and Young People's Mental Health and Wellbeing Profiling Tool has been developed to support an intelligence driven approach to understanding and meeting need. It collates and analyses a wide range of publically available data on risk, prevalence and detail (including cost data) on those services that support children with, or vulnerable to, mental illness. It provides commissioners, service providers, clinicians, services users and their families with the means to benchmark their area against similar populations and gain intelligence about what works.

The resource can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1xp2RBV

Dementia 2014, is the third annual report by The Alzheimer's Society looking at the quality of life for people with dementia in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The provides a snapshot of how well people are living with their dementia, what support they are receiving, and what barriers they face to living well. The report can be downloaded by clicking here: bit.ly/1qKLhG9

Dementia UK (2014) is commissioned through King's College London and the London School of Economics, provides the most detailed and robust picture to date of prevalence and economic impact of dementia in the UK. The research updates the findings of the 2007 Dementia UK report, which led to landmark changes in how dementia was prioritised across the UK. An accurate understanding of dementia prevalence and cost in the UK is an important lever for policy development, influencing, commissioning and service design. The overview can be downloaded by clicking here: bit.ly/1qE9L5v

This report looks at the epidemiology of public mental health, the quality of evidence, possible future innovations in science and technology, and the economic case for good mental health. It also outlines the importance of both treating mental health as equal to physical health and of focusing on the needs and safety of people with mental illness.

Highlights from the report include:

  • mental health is just as important as physical health, mental health services need to be valued and the scale of the burden of disease caused by mental illness needs to be acknowledged
  • more needs to be done to help people with mental illness stay in work, as since 2009, the number of working days lost to ‘stress, depression and anxiety’ has increased by 24% and the number lost to serious mental illness has doubled
  • there have been some very interesting technological innovations in mental healthcare and our understanding of the causes and development of mental illness is increasing through techniques such as neuroimaging, neuropsychology, genetics and blood-based biomarkers

The full report can be downloaded by clicking here: bit.ly/1qAgy06

There is a 6 page summary that can be downloaded by clicking here: bit.ly/WCOo81

A single page summary can be downloaded by clicking here:bit.ly/1qbGoIs

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