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Care

This briefing summarises NICE's recommendations for local authorities and partner organisations on improving access to health and social care services for vulnerable people who do not routinely use them, promoting equitable access for all. It is particularly relevant to health and wellbeing boards.The guidance can be accessed and downloaded by clicking here: bit.ly/1nFzvsv

This report provides our analysis of the likely social care needs and service requirements for older people across Bolton over the next 20 years. The report summarises the current demographic profile and projected changes across the area, current and projected levels of social care needs for older people, and likely future service requirements for supporting older people with social care needs. This report should be read by all commissioners and providers of services to older people.

This report highlights the work done by Bolton LINk around issues involving 'Homecare' Services in Bolton and the views of those individuals using the care. It uses those views to form a response to the issues and concerns to commissioners and providers. It should be read by all those involved in the commissioning and provision of services associated to specifically 'Homecare'  but also wider individual care -based services.

One in three people aged over 65, and half of those aged over 80, fall at least once a year. Falls cost the NHS more than £2 billion per year. With the number of people aged 65 and over predicted to increase by 2 million by 2021, these costs are set to rise further. One way to help design better services with more integrated treatment and rehabilitation for falls patients is to look more closely at where the costs of treating patients are incurred across health, community and social care services. This paper uses Torbay’s unique patient-level linked data set to explore the NHS and social care costs of the care pathway for older people in the 12 months before and after being admitted to hospital as a result of a fall.

Key Findings

  • On average, the cost of hospital, community and social care cost services for each patient who fell were almost four times as much in the 12 months after admission for a fall as the costs of the admission itself.
  • Comparing the 12 months before and after the fall, the most dramatic increase was in community care costs (160 per cent), compared to a 37 per cent increase in social care costs and a 35 per cent increase in acute hospital care costs.
  • While falls patients in this study accounted for slightly more than 1 per cent of Torbay’s over-65 population, in the 12 months that followed a fall, spending on their care accounted for 4 per cent of the whole annual inpatient acute hospital spending, and 4 per cent of the whole local adult social care budget.
  • There was evidence of significant under-coding of co-morbidities for falls patients, particularly for dementia.

This report should be of interest to all those involved in the commissioning of services that deal with 'falls' and more generally health/social care integration.

This is a collection of evidence that is supplemental and supportive to the JSNA Chapter: Safeguarding. It brings together all the most relevant intelligence, research and evidence to ensure best practice in decision making.

Please use the contents options to navigate the document, and then click on the title of any document that is of relevance

Recognised, valued and supported: next steps for the Carers Strategy sets out how the Government will work with carers and carers’ organisations. Government – local and national – should reciprocate the support carers show with measures that ease the responsibility of caring.

To download this report please click here: http://bit.ly/10Li7ee

This is a collection of evidence that is supplemental and supportive to the JSNA Chapter: Looked After Children. It brings together all the most relevant intelligence, research and evidence to ensure best practice in decision making.

Please use the contents options to navigate the document, and then click on the title of any document that is of relevance.

Putting People into Personalisation: Relational approaches to social care and housing, argues that social care needs a radical shake up to ensure genuine choice and empowerment for older people. Although not policy, it does present interesting ideas and discussion points for those involved in the commissioning of services to older people and/or housing. The green paper is attached below, and the website can be accessed here: http://bit.ly/5LNFV3

Other Bolton's Health Matters Knowledge Hub resources of relevance:

The report and summary presentation (attached below) present a summary of the key findings of the statutory 2011-12 Adult Social Care Survey together with data tables for all questions including comparisons with 2010-11 and North West and England averages.  They show a detailed breakdown of the adult social care 'customer' base alongside their perception of the services they currently recieve. Both of these documents should be of great interest to those involved in the commissioning and provision of adult care services in Bolton.

This report and presentation (both attached) show a summary of the key findings of the statutory 2012-13 Caring for Others survey together with data tables for all questions including comparisons with the 2009-10 pilot survey and North West and England averages (to be added summer 2013 once data is published). It contains quantitative and qualitative data on the carer demographic, experience & opinions of care and support, quality of life outcomes as well as stakeholder comments.

This is essential reading for all those with the commissioning and provision of care services.

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