Ethnicity | Boltons Health Matters
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Ethnicity

The link between poverty and ethnicity is complex, and the relationship is not yet well understood. This ongoing programme of research by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation looks at the underlying reasons for variations in low income and deprivation among different ethnic groups in the UK and the problems it causes. It also suggests ways to tackle poverty across all ethnicities more effectively. This collection of resources can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1adPRcL or each report can be accessed individually below:

A collection of maps that highlight countries of births from Bolton residents not born in the United Kingdom. The nations covered are:

  • Bangladesh
  • India
  • Iran
  • Kenya
  • Nigeria
  • Pakistan
  • Philippines
  • Somalia
  • South Africa

A review and synthesis of the evidence on improving access to primary care and preventing avoidable admission to hospital among vulnerable migrants, Gypsies and Travellers, people who are homeless, and sex workers.

A map that shows the population estimates (percentage) with low fluency with English by ward in Bolton.

A map that shows the population estimates (percentage) for Black and Minority Ethnic (non-white UK) by ward in Bolton.

This research looks at the experiences and preferences of low-income Caribbean, Pakistani and Somali people in balancing work and care responsibilities. It examines the particular challenges faced by these ethnic minority groups, and the challenges for employers and policy. It found that:

  • Discrimination prevents low-income ethnic minority people from balancing work and care;
  • Many people are unaware of free childcare provision for 2-4 year olds;
  • Benefit changes are likely to make it more difficult to balance work and care for these people;
  • Attitudes towards caring vary greatly across ethnic groups; and
  • Caring responsibilities were predominantly taken up by women.

 

This briefing summarises NICE's recommendations for local authorities and partner organisations on the use of body mass index (BMI) as a signal for preventive action against long-term medical conditions. The focus is on people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups (for a definition see 'Assessing body mass index and waist circumference thresholds for intervening to prevent ill health and premature death among adults from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups in the UK '). It is particularly relevant to health and wellbeing boards.

This briefing will complement advice in NICE's local government briefing on NHS health checks, due to be published in February 2014.

You can viewe this resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1dOdism

Public health guidance, PH46 - Issued: July 2013 (revised 2014)

This guidance aimed to determine whether lower cut-off points should be used for black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups in the UK as a trigger for lifestyle interventions to prevent conditions such as diabetes, myocardial infarction or stroke.

It is aimed at commissioners, managers and practitioners with public health as part of their remit working within local authorities, the NHS and the wider public, private, voluntary and community sectors,

The evidence confirms that these groups are at an equivalent risk of diabetes, other health conditions or mortality at a lower BMI than the white European population. But it was not sufficient to make recommendations on the use of new BMI and waist circumference thresholds to classify whether members of these groups are overweight or obese. There was also insufficient evidence to make recommendations on the full range of health conditions considered, or all-cause mortality (most of the evidence came from diabetes studies).

As a result, this guidance supports previously published NICE recommendations on diabetes prevention and extends them to black African and African-Caribbean groups. It also highlights recommendations from NICE and other sources in relation to awareness raising, BMI measurement and thresholds that can be used as a trigger for intervening.

The guidance can be viewed by clicking here: http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/index.jsp?action=byID&o=14201

 

This briefing summarises NICE's recommendations for local authorities and partner organisations on the use of body mass index (BMI) as a signal for preventive action against long-term medical conditions. The focus is on people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups (for a definition see 'Assessing body mass index and waist circumference thresholds for intervening to prevent ill health and premature death among adults from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups in the UK '). It is particularly relevant to health and wellbeing boards. The guidance can be accessed and downloaded by clicking here: bit.ly/1dOdism

This report is intended to:

  • Provide an overview of racial disparities in health currently being experienced by Black and other minority groups at a national level
  • Provide practical examples of the way in which current trends in racial disparities can be tackled from a review of existing research recommendations and individual/group feedback on the quality of health services.
  • Contribute to the priorities to be included in a JSNA from a BME perspective.
  • Encourage commissioners to consider the impact of health inequalities on their legal obligations to protect human rights and meet their obligations within the provisions of the Equality Act 2010.

This report should be of interest to all of those who are involved in strategic direction of JSNA as well as commissioners across Bolton Family.

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