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Older People

 

This is the JSNA chapter on Older People. Theme chapters summarises implications for commissioning, who is at risk and why, the level of need in the population, service provision and use, unmet needs, what works in terms of evidence, community views and priorities, any related equality impact assessments, unmet service needs/gaps and recommendations for further needs assessment work. 

This is the JSNA chapter on older people and housing. Theme chapters summarises implications for commissioning, who is at risk and why, the level of need in the population, service provision and use, unmet needs, what works in terms of evidence, community views and priorities, any related equality impact assessments, unmet service needs/gaps and recommendations for further needs assessment work. 

This indicator measures the number of council-supported older adults (aged 65 and over) whose long-term support needs were met by admission to residential and nursing care homes, per 100,000 population It is part of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework.

This Housing LIN Practice Briefing looks at the importance of end of life care delivered at home, describing the context, inequalities in end of life care, examples of good or emerging practice, and recommendations for actions. Funded by Public Health England, it is intended to be a practical guide for those working in mainstream and/or specialist housing, care and support and public health to understand their respective roles, and how they may work together, to help people to have their end of life care wishes met.

This resource can be accessed by clicking here: bit.ly/1QeCTg9

This Housing LIN Practice Briefing looks at active ageing and the different aspects of the built environment that can promote and sustain it, with examples of good and emerging practice and resources for further information. It is intended for those working in social housing, local government, and the care and support sectors to understand their roles in developing and maintaining a built environment that contributes to active ageing.

To access this resource, please click here: bit.ly/21pTXDL

http://bit.ly/21pTXDL
http://bit.ly/21pTXDL

This guidance is for all those involved in promoting older people's mental wellbeing. It focuses on practical support for everyday activities, based on occupational therapy principles and methods. This includes working  with older people and their carers to agree what kind of support they need. It replaces the guidance 'mental wellbeing and older people'

NICE recommendations include the following:

  • Offer regular sessions that encourage older people to construct daily routines to help maintain or improve their mental wellbeing. The sessions should also increase their knowledge of a range of issues, from nutrition and how to stay active to personal care.
  • Offer tailored, community-based physical activity programmes. These should include moderate-intensity activities (such as swimming, walking, dancing), strength and resistance training, and toning and stretching exercises.
  • Advise older people and their carers how to exercise safely for 30 minutes a day on 5 or more days a week, using examples of everyday activities such as shopping, housework and gardening. (The 30 minutes can be broken down into 10-minute bursts.)
  • Promote regular participation in local walking schemes as a way of improving mental wellbeing. Help and support older people to participate fully in these schemes, taking into account their health, mobility and personal preferences.
  • Involve occupational therapists in the design of training offered to practitioners.

This can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1CKdaFP

An infographic from ONS that presents an overview of what it is like to be an older person (65+) in the UK.

This resource can be viewed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1plzT0D

This briefing was commissioned by PHE and written by the Institute of Health Equity. It is a summary of a more detailed evidence review on the same topic and is intended primarily for directors of public health, public health teams and local authorities. This briefing and accompanying evidence reviews are part of a series commissioned by PHE to describe and demonstrate effective, practical local action on a range of social determinants of health.

You can view the briefing by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1wrW2i6

The associated evidence summary is:Local action on health inequalities: Increasing employment opportunities and improving workplace health

Summary
1. Being in good work protects health and wellbeing. Work is an important source of income needed for a healthy life and provides social opportunities that are good for health and wellbeing.
2. Poor working conditions contribute to early retirement. Older people in more disadvantaged social positions are more likely to have difficulty finding and keeping a job. Both issues contribute to health inequalities.
3. A range of employer approaches are likely to increase employment opportunities and retention among older people including measures to promote fair recruitment, equal training opportunities, flexible working, improvements to the physical and psychosocial work environment, phased retirement and succession planning.
4. For employers, the benefits of employing and retaining older workers can include reduced turnover and recruitment costs, positive employee feedback, retention of skills and experience and transfer of knowledge.

 

A map that shows the population estimates of hospital emergency admissions due to hip fractures in the over 65's by standardised rate  in Bolton by ward.

A map that shows the population estimates (by percentage) aged 60 or over who recieve pension in Bolton by ward.

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