Deprivation and Poverty | Boltons Health Matters
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Deprivation and Poverty

These documents outline the effects of working conditions on public health and set out information about how local public health partnerships can influence job creation.

They can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1iNZ2Vb 

This resource is part of the ‘Local Action on Health Inequalities’ Collection that can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1NvW6YD

The link between poverty and ethnicity is complex, and the relationship is not yet well understood. This ongoing programme of research by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation looks at the underlying reasons for variations in low income and deprivation among different ethnic groups in the UK and the problems it causes. It also suggests ways to tackle poverty across all ethnicities more effectively. This collection of resources can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1adPRcL or each report can be accessed individually below:

This briefing was commissioned by PHE and written by the Institute of Health Equity. It is a summary of a more detailed evidence review on the same topic and is intended primarily for directors of public health, public health teams and local authorities. This briefing and accompanying evidence reviews are part of a series commissioned by PHE to describe and demonstrate effective, practical local action on a range of social determinants of health.

You can view the briefing by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1tnWbWY

The associated evidence summary is: Local action on health inequalities: Health inequalities and the living wage

Summary
1. Evidence shows that insufficient income is associated with worse outcomes across virtually all domains of health, including long-term health and life expectancy.
2. The negative health effects of living on a low income can be caused by material factors (the inability to afford the items necessary for a healthy life) and/or psychosocial factors (such as ‘status anxiety’).
3. Adopting the living wage has been shown to improve psychological health and wellbeing among employees and increase life expectancy.
4. Local authorities can lead by example as a major employer by paying a living wage to all directly employed staff and, where appropriate, contracted staff. The rationale and benefits of the living wage will need to be explained clearly to partners.
5. Innovative approaches to implementing the living wage in procurement, including applying the Social Value Act 2012 might also be used.

This factsheet compiles up-to-date key information and data about obesity and its determinants in an easily readable format. The data factsheets will be a useful resource for policy makers, practitioners and anyone with an interest in obesity. They will be updated regularly. The latest factsheet can be downloaded by clicking here:Data Factsheet: Child Obesity and Socioeconomic Status

This factsheet compiles up-to-date key information and data about obesity and its determinants in an easily readable format. The data factsheets will be a useful resource for policy makers, practitioners and anyone with an interest in obesity. They will be updated regularly. The latest factsheet can be downloaded by clicking here: Data Factsheet: Adult Obesity and Socioeconomic Status

To help build the evidence for JRF’s anti-poverty strategy, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation commissioned researchers to carry out reviews of existing policy and research on a wide range of social issues that are related to poverty. The 33 studies in this collection are the findings of those reviews, and there are links to more detailed reports by the research teams, where available.

The reviews are split into five sections:

The full evidence summary can be downloaded by clicking here: bit.ly/1tJjeZ5

A map that shows the population estimates (percentage) of children under 15 in income deprived households by ward in Bolton.

A map that shows the population estimates (percentage) for families claiming benefits/on a low income by ward in Bolton.

This research looks at the experiences and preferences of low-income Caribbean, Pakistani and Somali people in balancing work and care responsibilities. It examines the particular challenges faced by these ethnic minority groups, and the challenges for employers and policy. It found that:

  • Discrimination prevents low-income ethnic minority people from balancing work and care;
  • Many people are unaware of free childcare provision for 2-4 year olds;
  • Benefit changes are likely to make it more difficult to balance work and care for these people;
  • Attitudes towards caring vary greatly across ethnic groups; and
  • Caring responsibilities were predominantly taken up by women.

 

An Overview of Citizens Advice Bureau activity in Bolton across 2011/12 and 2012/13. It should be of interest to those dealing directly with service users and those involved in the poverty agenda.

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