Long Standing/Long Term Limiting Illness | Boltons Health Matters
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Long Standing/Long Term Limiting Illness

 

This is the JSNA chapter on Long Standing and Limiting Illness and Disability. Theme chapters summarises implications for commissioning, who is at risk and why, the level of need in the population, service provision and use, unmet needs, what works in terms of evidence, community views and priorities, any related equality impact assessments, unmet service needs/gaps and recommendations for further needs assessment work. 

This briefing was commissioned by PHE and written by the Institute of Health Equity. It is a summary of a more detailed evidence review on the same topic and is intended primarily for directors of public health, public health teams and local authorities. This briefing and accompanying evidence reviews are part of a series commissioned by PHE to describe and demonstrate effective, practical local action on a range of social determinants of health.

You can view the briefing by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1nj6dps

The associated evidence summary is:Local action on health inequalities: Increasing employment opportunities and improving workplace health

Summary
1. Disabled people and those with long-term health conditions have far lower employment rates than other groups. Disability is more common among people in more disadvantaged socio-economic positions.
2. Differences between the health and employment prospects of people with a long-term health condition or disability are a source of health inequalities. Being out of work can contribute to further deterioration in health among people with a long-term condition or disability.
3. Local authorities can promote local employer awareness of national employment programmes, such as Access to Work, and guidance and legislation such as the Equality Act 2010. There are also examples of good local employment support programmes.
4. Evidence suggests that personalised, tailored support is effective in helping people with disabilities or long-term conditions into work. There is good evidence that individual placement and support programmes are effective for out of work people with severe mental health problems. A ‘health-first’ approaches that aims to improve health to increase the employability of incapacity benefit claimants is showing early promise.
5. Local authorities may be able to influence provision of local employment services by ensuring that employment service providers are members of health and wellbeing boards.

This is a collection of evidence that is supplemental and supportive to the JSNA Chapter: Limiting Long Term Illness and Disability in Adults. It brings together all the most relevant intelligence, research and evidence to ensure best practice in decision making.

Please use the contents options to navigate the document, and then click on the title of any document that is of relevance.

Presentation from February 2009 that looks into future projections of limiting long term illness and disability for the Bolton area. This contains useful projections and statistics that may support more qualiatitive-based work. 

Map showing prevalence of current levels of population that are classed as a carer for someone with a long-term illness or disability for 50 hours a week within Bolton at MSOA (Middle Super Output Area) level. Taken from Bolton Health Survey 2010.

Map showing prevalence of current levels of population that are classed as a carer for someone with a long-term illness or disability within Bolton at MSOA (Middle Super Output Area) level. Taken from Bolton Health Survey 2010.

Map showing prevalence of current individuals who have some form of long standing ill-health or disabilitywithin Bolton at MSOA (Middle Super Output Area) level. Taken from Bolton Health Survey 2010.

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