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Housing

This is the JSNA chapter on older people and housing. Theme chapters summarises implications for commissioning, who is at risk and why, the level of need in the population, service provision and use, unmet needs, what works in terms of evidence, community views and priorities, any related equality impact assessments, unmet service needs/gaps and recommendations for further needs assessment work. 

This is the JSNA chapter on housing. Theme chapters summarises implications for commissioning, who is at risk and why, the level of need in the population, service provision and use, unmet needs, what works in terms of evidence, community views and priorities, any related equality impact assessments, unmet service needs/gaps and recommendations for further needs assessment work. 

This is the JSNA chapter on homelessness. Theme chapters summarises implications for commissioning, who is at risk and why, the level of need in the population, service provision and use, unmet needs, what works in terms of evidence, community views and priorities, any related equality impact assessments, unmet service needs/gaps and recommendations for further needs assessment work. 

This Housing LIN Practice Briefing looks at the importance of end of life care delivered at home, describing the context, inequalities in end of life care, examples of good or emerging practice, and recommendations for actions. Funded by Public Health England, it is intended to be a practical guide for those working in mainstream and/or specialist housing, care and support and public health to understand their respective roles, and how they may work together, to help people to have their end of life care wishes met.

This resource can be accessed by clicking here: bit.ly/1QeCTg9

This Housing LIN Practice Briefing looks at active ageing and the different aspects of the built environment that can promote and sustain it, with examples of good and emerging practice and resources for further information. It is intended for those working in social housing, local government, and the care and support sectors to understand their roles in developing and maintaining a built environment that contributes to active ageing.

To access this resource, please click here: bit.ly/21pTXDL

http://bit.ly/21pTXDL
http://bit.ly/21pTXDL

The housing stock model included the presence of a serious hazard under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS) and two specific hazards: excess cold and falls. The presence of disrepair was also included.

The Acorn groups most at risk of living in a property with multiple issues, including a serious hazard, a falls hazard, or disrepair are ‘4.L Modest means’ and ‘5.O Young hardship’. The group ‘5.O Young hardship’ is also at risk of an excess cold hazard. They tend to be younger people living in small terraced houses with modest incomes. They may need some support to make improvements to properties, or encourage their private landlords to do so.

Overall, people living in properties with an excess cold hazard tend to be more affluent and with significant savings, with which they may be able to make improvements.

The more deprived group ‘4.N Poorer Pensioners’ are also likely to live in a property with an excess cold hazard. The number of households is smaller, but older people are the group most likely to suffer harm from excess cold.

 

This is a training resource developed by Public health England and Sitra. These are designed to support housing providers improve the health and wellbeing of customers. They also support staff to develop the competencies needed to deliver public health messages and “nudge” healthy behaviours.

The resource pack can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1Np2Uq6

This resource is part of a wider collection developed by Sitra and PHE that can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1Gg75Fc

Understanding the inter-relationship between housing, poor health and wellbeing is essential to shape local policy responses that tackle both poor housing conditions/characteristics and health inequalities.  It is vital that local stakeholders commissioning and delivering housing interventions do so with both an eye to the health implications of their proposed actions, as well as the opportunities to tackle poor health outcomes which such initiatives might offer up.  Equally important is that local healthcare and social care commissioners and providers recognise how the home environment and housing circumstances of their patients and customers can determine their health and wellbeing, and the effectiveness of healthcare and social care interventions.

This resource will better equip local decision makers and practitioners to improve health and wellbeing and reduce health inequalities. It will:

  • Inform a local shared understanding of the relationship between the home environment, physical and mental health and wellbeing, and which part/s of the population may be most at risk.
  • Inform local discussions about the options to address housing issues as a means to improving health and wellbeing, and reducing health inequalities.

You can access this resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1OUb6jV

The cold weather collection gives advice to help prevent the major avoidable effects on health during periods of cold weather in England.

This collection of resources can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1PuL2MH

These are a collection of examples of best practice as undertaken by the National Conversation on Health Inequalities (NCHI) that covered a wide spectrum of public health activity. Please click on the links below to go to the case studies:

 

 

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