People and Places | Boltons Health Matters
Skip to main content

People and Places

This is a training resource developed by Public health England and Sitra. These are designed to support housing providers improve the health and wellbeing of customers. They also support staff to develop the competencies needed to deliver public health messages and “nudge” healthy behaviours.

The resource pack can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1Np2Uq6

This resource is part of a wider collection developed by Sitra and PHE that can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1Gg75Fc

Understanding the inter-relationship between housing, poor health and wellbeing is essential to shape local policy responses that tackle both poor housing conditions/characteristics and health inequalities.  It is vital that local stakeholders commissioning and delivering housing interventions do so with both an eye to the health implications of their proposed actions, as well as the opportunities to tackle poor health outcomes which such initiatives might offer up.  Equally important is that local healthcare and social care commissioners and providers recognise how the home environment and housing circumstances of their patients and customers can determine their health and wellbeing, and the effectiveness of healthcare and social care interventions.

This resource will better equip local decision makers and practitioners to improve health and wellbeing and reduce health inequalities. It will:

  • Inform a local shared understanding of the relationship between the home environment, physical and mental health and wellbeing, and which part/s of the population may be most at risk.
  • Inform local discussions about the options to address housing issues as a means to improving health and wellbeing, and reducing health inequalities.

You can access this resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1OUb6jV

The information contained in this resource assesses the scale of health lost from diseases and injuries in 2013, and estimates of the attributable impact of risk factors. The paper reports health lost by UK country, 9 English regions, age, gender and deprivation.

The study:

  • shows the main causes of health loss in a country or area
  • shows causes which are getting worse or are improving
  • compares causes between different areas and countries
  • assesses where is the greatest potential to reduce burden
  • assesses the effect of deprivation and other risk factors on disease patterns

You can access this resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1NelQI1

The cold weather collection gives advice to help prevent the major avoidable effects on health during periods of cold weather in England.

This collection of resources can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1PuL2MH

In depth analytical topic report from the Public Health Intelligence Team of the resident Bolton population using ACORN software

  • Acorn is a segmentation tool that groups households based on where they live, and helps to understand the different types of communities that make up a larger population and their likely needs, behaviours and opinions relating to a wide range of topics.
  • The PHIT team has access to two different segmentations. Both give information about the likely demographics of households, the type of housing they live in, and their socioeconomic status. In addition Acorn gives information about their interests, spending habits and use of the internet while Wellbeing Acorn focusses on topics including likely health conditions experienced, adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviours, and extent of engagement with NHS patient forums.
  • Approximately 60% of Bolton’s population is made up of an even split between the most deprived Acorn categories ‘4 Financially stretched’, and ‘5 Urban adversity’. A further 40% are evenly split between the middling category ‘3 Comfortable communities’ and most affluent category ‘1 Affluent achievers’.
  • A third of the Bolton population falls into the Wellbeing Acorn group ‘2 At risk’; these neighbourhoods do not generally have high incidences of illness, however multiple unhealthy behaviours could put their health at risk in the future. Around half of the Bolton population is evenly split between the two more healthy Wellbeing Acorn groups ’4 Healthy’ and ‘3 Caution’. Some differences were seen when compared with 2014 data, whereby the proportion of residents in Great Lever and Rumworth changed to relatively more healthy Wellbeing Acorn Types. Most of these changes took place between 2014-15 with fewer changes 2015-16.
  • The insights gained from Acorn data are particularly useful when combined with locally collected data. Acorn data could be used to add value particularly by providing detail about people’s lifestyle choices in wider areas of their life, and checking whether service users were those people whom the service expects or wishes to particularly target.

In depth analytical topic report from the Public Health Intelligence Team examining the potential customer-base of the proposed wellness software using ACORN software. You can read part 1 of this report (Bolton Integrated Wellness Service – Customers) by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1k4Qhqt

Headlines

  • The Bolton Integrated Wellness Service will combine existing separate services aimed at helping adults live a healthier lifestyle into one joined up offer. A previous paper described developing 3 groups of potential clients.
  • ‘Unhealthy adversity’ is a combination of low wellbeing, smoking, and less healthy food habits. These people tend to be younger and more deprived; they may live in environments that make it more challenging for them to make healthy choices, and advice and support needs to be tailored accordingly. Many report poor health, with a minority experiencing very poor health - these people may need support to adapt the general healthy living advice to make changes while managing their other health issues.
  • ‘Inactive overweight’ is a combination of low levels of physical activity and a BMI over healthy weight. These people tend to be middle aged and older, living across affluent and deprived neighbourhoods. Services and support offered to this group need to be relevant to people across a diverse range of backgrounds. These people are starting to experience ill-health which may have a lifestyle component; this could be a successful lever to encourage them to make behaviour changes.
  • ‘Imbibers’ are those who drink alcohol at increasing risk levels. They are likely to be in middle age, living in affluent parts of Bolton. Communications should be careful not to seem patronising towards these people who are often highly educated and working in roles with high status and/ or levels of responsibility. Since these people are in generally good health they may not be likely to actively seek out opportunities to make behaviour changes; awareness raising where they are already likely to be could be a first step in encouraging behaviour change.
  • All groups will contain a large majority who use the internet daily but also a substantial minority who had never used the internet. Mobile internet is frequently used, so all websites should be mobile friendly.
  • Non internet users tend to be older and less likely to work in managerial or professional jobs. Younger non internet users may be on an especially low income. Non-internet users prefer to be first contacted by phone, text message or post. Acorn type ‘5.Q.58 Singles and young families, some receiving benefits’, likely to be part of ‘Unhealthy adversity’ are much more likely than average to want to be first approached by home visit.
  • Nearly half of all groups use social media. ‘Unhealthy adversity’ are most likely to do so, and to be more active users. Maintaining a Wellness service social media presence is recommended.
  • Medical, health or fitness apps (particularly paid products) are less popular among the behaviour groups, and likely to be downloaded by a small minority only. Mobile friendly websites and signposting to existing apps are likely to be most appropriate.
  • the numbers of people exhibiting less healthy behaviours is large, but we do not know how many of these people want to make a behaviour change, whether they are already trying to, and if so what services or products they are using to help with this. Data indicating the market share achieved by the Wellness service and how it compares to and is differentiated from alternative services and products should be collected as part of its monitoring data.

In depth analytical topic report from the Public Health Intelligence Team on customer profiles of the proposed integrated wellness service. You can read part 2 of this report (Bolton Integrated Wellness Service - Customers Insights from Acorn data) by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1Qs1nQI

Headlines

  • The Bolton Integrated Wellness Service will combine existing separate services aimed at helping adults live a healthier lifestyle into one joined up offer.
  • Bolton Health and Wellbeing Survey 2010 provided information on the following less healthy behaviours that the service will aim to tackle: respondents’ levels of physical activity, alcohol consumption, weight status, food habits, smoking status and wellbeing. It was very common for people to engage in these less healthy behaviours, 84% did 1 or more, and 52% did 2 or more.
  • A factor analysis was performed to see if some behaviours more commonly occurred together. 3 fairly discrete factors emerged.
  • ‘Unhealthy adversity’ was a combination of low wellbeing, smoking, and less healthy food habits. These people tended to be younger, more deprived, and in poor health, with a minority experiencing very poor health. There are an estimated 24,000 of these people in Bolton.
  • ‘Inactive overweight’ was a combination of low levels of physical activity and a BMI over healthy weight. These people tended to be middle aged and older, living across affluent and deprived neighbourhoods, and experiencing poor health. There are an estimated 51,000 of these people in Bolton.
  • ‘Imbibers’ were those who drank alcohol at increasing risk levels. They were likely to be in middle age, living in affluent parts of Bolton and in generally good health. There are an estimated 39,000 of these people in Bolton.
  • These profiles can be used to plan services that meet these different groups of residents’ needs.

This resource supports local joint strategic needs assessments (JSNAs) and the commissioning of interventions to improve the mental wellbeing of local children and young people. The guide explains about mental wellbeing and its determinants. The technical appendix has measures to quantify mental wellbeing and its determinants, information on using the measures and links to examples of evidence based practice.

You can access them by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1OeTP4u

This resource collection contributes to the emerging evidence base by drawing out the key messages from independent evaluations of their Dementia Friendly Community (DFC) programmes. This collection consists of three resources (please click on title to access resource):

  1. Shared learning from programmes
  2. Evaluation of Bradford Dementia Friendly Communities Programme
  3. Evaluation of York Dementia Friendly Communities Programme

Ways Forward

  • The active, meaningful engagement of people with dementia and their families is fundamental.
  • DFCs must engage with, and achieve equity for, all people with dementia, whatever their circumstances.
  • Practical barriers to inclusion must be addressed if normal lives are to be continued.
  • The human rights of people with dementia and carers must be recognised and promoted.
  • DFCs must be underpinned by ongoing awareness raising, training and positive media coverage.
  • Connections and networks, within and beyond the community, are at the heart of DFCs.
  • Local grassroots community activity is the bedrock of DFCs.
  • This activity must be supported by strong strategic planning, commissioning and leadership.
  • Both primary and secondary health providers have a vital role to play in supporting social inclusion
  • There is no template - each community must develop its own approach.

Share this: