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Physical Activity

This is the JSNA chapter on physical activity. Theme chapters summarises implications for commissioning, who is at risk and why, the level of need in the population, service provision and use, unmet needs, what works in terms of evidence, community views and priorities, any related equality impact assessments, unmet service needs/gaps and recommendations for further needs assessment work. 

This Housing LIN Practice Briefing looks at active ageing and the different aspects of the built environment that can promote and sustain it, with examples of good and emerging practice and resources for further information. It is intended for those working in social housing, local government, and the care and support sectors to understand their roles in developing and maintaining a built environment that contributes to active ageing.

To access this resource, please click here: bit.ly/21pTXDL

http://bit.ly/21pTXDL
http://bit.ly/21pTXDL

These are a collection of examples of best practice as undertaken by the National Conversation on Health Inequalities (NCHI) that covered a wide spectrum of public health activity. Please click on the links below to go to the case studies:

 

 

This rapid evidence review aims to identify relevant literature on the physiological, psychological, social, and behavioural outcomes of physical activity participation among children aged 5 to 11 years, and provide an indication of the strength of the evidence for each outcome.

You can access this by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1LYPcZs

This document shows progress against the actions set out in Living Well for Longer: National support for local action which followed a call to action from the Secretary of State.

The report shows that there has been improved prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of the 5 big killers:

  • cancer
  • stroke
  • heart disease
  • lung disease
  • liver disease

It also outlines the next steps for ongoing improvements across the system in reducing premature mortality.

NICE quality standards describe high-priority areas for quality improvement in a defined care or service area. Each standard consists of a prioritised set of specific, concise and measurable statements. They draw on existing guidance, which provides an underpinning, comprehensive set of recommendations, and are designed to support the measurement of improvement.

This quality standard covers encouraging physical activity in people of all ages who are in contact with the NHS, including staff, patients and carers. It does not cover encouraging physical activity for particular conditions; this is included in condition-specific quality standards where appropriate

This resource can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1DY8y0o

‘Everybody active, every day’ is a national, evidence-based approach to support all sectors to embed physical activity into the fabric of daily life and make it an easy, cost-effective and ‘normal’ choice in every community in England.

PHE has co-produced the framework with over 1,000 national and local leaders in physical activity and is calling for action from providers and commissioners in: health, social care, transportation, planning, education, sport and leisure, culture, the voluntary and community sector, as well as public and private employers.

To make active lifestyles a reality for all, the framework’s 4 areas for action will:

  • change the social ‘norm’ to make physical activity the expectation
  • develop expertise and leadership within professionals and volunteers
  • create environments to support active lives
  • identify and up-scale successful programmes nationwide

This resource can be accessed by clicking here:  http://bit.ly/1sTcEiu

A map showing the percentage of the adult population (age 16 and over) who participate in sport and active recreation, at moderate intensity, for at least 30 minutes on at least 12 days out of the last 4 weeks (equivalent to 30 minutes on 3 or more days a week). This includes light intensity activities (bowls, archery, croquet, yoga and pilates) for those age 65 and over. This resource can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1txuMBQ

Why do some people play sport? And why do some simply not want to join in? Sport England has developed nineteen sporting segments to help us understand the nation's attitudes to sport, their motivations and barriers. For more detail on the development of these segments click here.

Using this site you can:

Find out more about Segments and answer questions such as ‘what is the dominant segment in my local authority area’ or ‘which segment lives within the catchment of my sports centre’ or ‘where can I find Leanne?’

Explore a particular Sport and answer questions such as ‘which segments are more likely to play my sport’ or ‘which segments play team sports’ or ‘in this area, where are the people located who are more likely to play tennis?’

Investigate further Characteristics about the segments and answer questions such as ‘where are people located who would like to play sport to lose weight?’

This resource displays data at a national and local area. It can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1sVmaD6

 

This factsheet compiles up-to-date key information and data about obesity and its determinants in an easily readable format. The data factsheets will be a useful resource for policy makers, practitioners and anyone with an interest in obesity. They will be updated regularly. The latest factsheet can be downloaded by clicking here:Data Factsheet: Child Physical Activity

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