Behaviour and Risk Factors | Boltons Health Matters
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Behaviour and Risk Factors

This guidance is for all those involved in promoting older people's mental wellbeing. It focuses on practical support for everyday activities, based on occupational therapy principles and methods. This includes working  with older people and their carers to agree what kind of support they need. It replaces the guidance 'mental wellbeing and older people'

NICE recommendations include the following:

  • Offer regular sessions that encourage older people to construct daily routines to help maintain or improve their mental wellbeing. The sessions should also increase their knowledge of a range of issues, from nutrition and how to stay active to personal care.
  • Offer tailored, community-based physical activity programmes. These should include moderate-intensity activities (such as swimming, walking, dancing), strength and resistance training, and toning and stretching exercises.
  • Advise older people and their carers how to exercise safely for 30 minutes a day on 5 or more days a week, using examples of everyday activities such as shopping, housework and gardening. (The 30 minutes can be broken down into 10-minute bursts.)
  • Promote regular participation in local walking schemes as a way of improving mental wellbeing. Help and support older people to participate fully in these schemes, taking into account their health, mobility and personal preferences.
  • Involve occupational therapists in the design of training offered to practitioners.

This can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1CKdaFP

The advice provided can be adapted to suit local circumstances and provides suggested sections that commissioners may wish to include in their contracts with providers of internet based chlamydia screening.

The considerations for commissioning in this guidance are applicable regardless of who the commissioner of the internet based service is and the local commissioning model chosen.

You can access this resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1xAX1N1


Smoking damages the health of offenders and those around them. Stopping smoking will therefore result in many benefits for offenders. Effective treatments exist to help offenders reduce or stop smoking, including those with co-morbidities, and this guidance has outlined a joined-up care pathway to do this.

The guidance brings together the research on smoking in prisons and outlines a joined-up care pathway for treatment.

You can access this resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1EUa5oq

 

This guideline makes recommendations on behaviours that may help people maintain a healthy weight or prevent excess weight gain. The recommendations support those made in other NICE guidelines about effective interventions and activities to prevent people becoming overweight or obese. This includes interventions and activities in which weight is not the primary outcome, such as those aimed at preventing cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes, improving mental wellbeing or increasing active travel.

Excess weight may increase the risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, liver disease, osteoarthritis, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers such as breast, colon, endometrial and kidney cancer. People who are overweight or obese may also experience mental health problems, stigmatisation and discrimination because of their weight.

The recommendations aim to:

  • encourage people to make changes in line with existing advice
  • encourage people to develop physical activity and dietary habits that will help them maintain a healthy weight and prevent excess weight gain
  • encourage people to monitor their own weight and associated behaviours
  • promote the clear communication of benefits of maintaining a healthy weight and making gradual changes to physical activity and diet
  • ensure messages are tailored to specific groups
  • ensure activities are integrated with the local strategic approach to obesity.

The guideline covers children (after weaning) and adults. It does not cover the particular needs of women during pregnancy or people who have conditions that increase their risk of being overweight or obese.

The guideline is for practitioners who use related NICE guidance and need advice on behaviours that may help people maintain a healthy weight and prevent excess weight gain.

This includes practitioners who provide information on maintaining a healthy weight or preventing excess weight gain and people who commission, design, implement or evaluate interventions that directly or indirectly help different population groups maintain a healthy weight or prevent excess weight gain. In addition, it may be of interest to members of the public.

You can access this resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1BogBMT

The Young People's Profiles allow areas to see how they perform against the national average and against other local areas when considering the key public health outcomes for young people. Baseline and trend information are provided where available. The Young People’s Profiles support Public Health England’s report, Improving young people’s health and wellbeing: a framework for public health which gives practical support to councillors, health and wellbeing boards, commissioners, and service providers.

The Young People's Profiles are displayed in four views:

The following guide shows you how to use the tool and explains its various features: Quick guide to using Young People's Profiles

The whole resource can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/15OIkOm

The Framework has been developed as a resource to enable local areas in the delivery of their public health role for young people. It poses questions for councillors, health and wellbeing boards, commissioners, providers and education and learning settings to help them support young people to be healthy and to improve outcomes for young people.

It focuses on 6 inter-connected principles, the core one being: Relationships with friends and family and a sense of belonging, are central to young people’s health and wellbeing; which is linked to the other five:

  • Accessing young people friendly services
  • Understanding young people’s changing health needs as they develop
  • Integrated services that meet needs holistically and that are centred on young people
  • Reduce health inequalities for those most in need by providing targeted services
  • A positive focus on what makes young people feel well and able to cope

The resource can be accessed by clicking here: http://bit.ly/15XgGQf 

This resource describes how public health in a number of councils has started to use the opportunities of a local government setting to improve health and wellbeing.

The case studies were chosen because they show a range of ways in which public health in councils is approaching working with local business. They include councils spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. The LGA looks forward to seeing many more such examples of local energy and innovation in the months and years to come, and seeing the measurable impact it will have. The challenge for us all is not just to identify good practice, but to champion and share it.

Case studies include:

  • Creating a healthier workplace
  • Creating a less obeseogenic enviornment
  • Improving child vaccination rates
  • Working with early year providers

You can download the resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1zSrjOh

This resource describes how public health in a number of councils has started to use the opportunities of a local government setting to improve health and wellbeing.

The case studies were chosen because they show a range of ways in which public health in councils is approaching working with local business. They include councils spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. The LGA looks forward to seeing many more such examples of local energy and innovation in the months and years to come, and seeing the measurable impact it will have. The challenge for us all is not just to identify good practice, but to champion and share it.

Case studies include:

  • Creating a healthier workplace
  • Creating a less obeseogenic enviornment
  • Improving child vaccination rates
  • Working with early year providers

You can download the resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1zSrjOh

The transfer of public health responsibilities from the NHS to local government and Public Health England (PHE) represents a unique opportunity to set out a local approach to tackling obesity and change the focus from treatment to prevention.

The LGA is calling on government to help people live healthier lives and tackle the harm caused by obesity by reinvesting a fifth of existing VAT raised on sweets and sugary drinks and of the duty raised on alcohol in preventative measures to support an environment and a culture where a balanced and healthy diet is the norm and appropriate physical activity is available to everyone.

- See more at: http://www.local.gov.uk/web/guest/publications/-/journal_content/56/10180/6910577/PUBLICATION#sthash.Abv2oB1i.dpuf

The transfer of public health responsibilities from the NHS to local government and Public Health England (PHE) represents a unique opportunity to set out a local approach to tackling obesity and change the focus from treatment to prevention.

The LGA is calling on government to help people live healthier lives and tackle the harm caused by obesity by reinvesting a fifth of existing VAT raised on sweets and sugary drinks and of the duty raised on alcohol in preventative measures to support an environment and a culture where a balanced and healthy diet is the norm and appropriate physical activity is available to everyone.

You can download the resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1FtqBca

The transfer of public health responsibilities from the NHS to local government and Public Health England (PHE) represents a unique opportunity to set out a local approach to tackling alcohol misuse. We are calling on Government to help people live healthier lives and tackle the harm caused by excessive drinking and alcohol dependence by:

  • reinvesting a fifth of existing alcohol duty in preventative measures
  • giving councils the power to take public health issues into account when making licensing decisions
  • supporting licensing and trading standards departments to better tackle the black market in alcohol.

You can download the resource by clicking here: http://bit.ly/1DWRjca

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